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The Legacy of Muslim Societies in Global Modernity | Al-Samman, Hanadi
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Hanadi Al-Samman

Affiliation

University of Virginia

Title

Assistant Professor, Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures

Bio

Hanadi Al-Samman is an assistant professor of Arabic Language and Literature in the Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures department at the University of Virginia. Her research focuses on Middle Eastern and Arab women’s studies, transnational and Islamic feminism(s), postcolonial and identity formation theories, as well as on literature of the Arab diaspora.

Her research has been published in Journal of Arabic Literature, Women's Studies International Forum, Alif: Journal of Comparative Poetics, and in edited collections of edited and translated literary works. She is currently working on a book manuscript entitled Anxiety of Erasure: Trauma, Authorship, and the Diaspora in Arab Women’s Writings. The book examines the literature of Arab women writers of the European and North American diaspora, and formulates a theory of Arab women’s authorship influenced by Shahrazād’s orality syndrome, anxiety of erasure, and the pre-Islamic tradition of female infanticide/wa’d al-banāt.

Selected Publications

Books
Anxiety of Erasure: Trauma, Authorship, and the Diaspora in Arab Women’s Writings  (in progress).

Co-editor (with Tarek El-Ariss), "Beyond the Arab Closet," special issue of International Journal of Middle East Studies 44:2 (Forthcoming May 2012).

Articles
"Embodying Arab Lesbian Identity." in "Beyond the Arab Closet." Eds. Hanadi Al-Samman and Tarek El-Ariss, a special issue of International Journal of Middle East Studies 44:2 (Forthcoming May 2012).

"Teaching Arabic Literature in an Age of Comparative Consumption." in Teaching Arabic Literature. Ed. Muhsin al-Musawi. New York: The Modern Language Association of America, (Forthcoming 2011).

"Remapping Arab Narrative and Sexual Desire in Salwa al-Neimi's The Proof of the Honey." Journal of Arabic Literature (Forthcoming 2011).

"US Muslim Women's Movements and the Islamic Feminine Hermeneutics.” in Mapping Arab Women’s Movements. Eds. Nawar Al-Hassan Golley and Pernille Arenfeldt. (Forthcoming 2011).

“Anxiety of Erasure: Arab Women Writers between Shahrazad’s Memory and the Nightmare of Infanticide.” Alif: Journal of Comparative Poetics 30 (2010): 73-97. (In Arabic).

“Transforming Nationhood from Within the Minefield: Arab Female Guerrilla Fighters and the Politics of Peace Poetics.” Women's Studies International Forum 32.5 (2009): 331-339.

“Out of the Closet: Representation of Homosexuals and Lesbians in Modern Arabic Literature.” Journal of Arabic Literature 39.2 (2008): 270-310.

“Contemporary Syrian Literature: An Introduction.” in Literature from the “Axis of Evil”: Writing from Iran, Iraq, North Korea, and Other Enemy Nations . Ed. Words Without Borders. New York: The New Press, 2006.













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